209 continental engine on propane

Propane, Butane, LPG, GPL, C3H8, C4H10
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geraldm
Posts: 94
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 4:53 pm
Location: Pump handle Saskatchewan

209 continental engine on propane

Post by geraldm »

Hi everyone been a while .. rebuilding a 209 continental industrial engine converted to propane and was wondering about the heat riser settings in the exhaust manifold ( typical old 2 piece that bolts together ) should it be set differently than it was for gasoline. the casting simply says on --off . im guessing it should be set to deliver max heat for the propane . the old towmotor forklift it is going back into does very little work , mostly just puttering in the yard moving a few things around now and then. will it even make any difference on keeping the propane a gas. thanks Gerald..
Now how the hell did that happen ?

storm
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Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:10 pm
Location: NSW, Australia

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by storm »

I personally would have it set to off. Why? Heat risers are there to heat up the intake to help liquid fuels (petrol) atomise. LPG is already a gas and doesn't need heat in the air stream to help it atomise.
Fuel flow requirements calculations
Engine air flow requirement calculation: CFM = Cubic Inches x RPM x Volumetric Efficiency (VE) ÷ 3456

geraldm
Posts: 94
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 4:53 pm
Location: Pump handle Saskatchewan

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by geraldm »

Thank you for your time Storm .
Now how the hell did that happen ?

BigBlockMopar
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Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by BigBlockMopar »

In addition, a heated intake-charge will expand the air/fuel-mixture and therefore less of it will be available to the engine per cycle to extract power from.
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Tom68
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Location: Australia

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by Tom68 »

geraldm wrote:
Mon May 13, 2019 4:44 pm
Hi everyone been a while .. rebuilding a 209 continental industrial engine converted to propane and was wondering about the heat riser settings in the exhaust manifold ( typical old 2 piece that bolts together ) should it be set differently than it was for gasoline. the casting simply says on --off . im guessing it should be set to deliver max heat for the propane . the old towmotor forklift it is going back into does very little work , mostly just puttering in the yard moving a few things around now and then. will it even make any difference on keeping the propane a gas. thanks Gerald..
On the other hand a heated inlet charge needs less ignition advance, if you have limitations on how much advance you can add intake heat will ensure a fast flame front that'll be less taxing on the cooling system and easier on exhaust valves.

Better to run a cool inlet charge and adjust ignition point to suit though.

storm
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Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:10 pm
Location: NSW, Australia

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by storm »

Tom68 wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 5:48 pm
On the other hand a heated inlet charge needs less ignition advance, if you have limitations on how much advance you can add intake heat will ensure a fast flame front that'll be less taxing on the cooling system and easier on exhaust valves.
Yes and No, well actually just No.

What you are actually referring to is air density not air temperature, less advance is required when the air is less dense. Heated air is less dense than cool air, also the higher you go above sea level the less dense the air is due to air pressure.
Tom68 wrote:
Sat May 18, 2019 5:48 pm
Better to run a cool inlet charge and adjust ignition point to suit though.
All else being equal cooler air entering the engine is much better. The density of the air entering the engine has a direct impact of engine efficiency, heat the air and you lose efficiency.
Fuel flow requirements calculations
Engine air flow requirement calculation: CFM = Cubic Inches x RPM x Volumetric Efficiency (VE) ÷ 3456

geraldm
Posts: 94
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 4:53 pm
Location: Pump handle Saskatchewan

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by geraldm »

thankyou everyone interesting comments
Now how the hell did that happen ?

geraldm
Posts: 94
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 4:53 pm
Location: Pump handle Saskatchewan

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by geraldm »

https://youtu.be/Rer5J2HPSIw engine refresh went great
Now how the hell did that happen ?

storm
Posts: 703
Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:10 pm
Location: NSW, Australia

Re: 209 continental engine on propane

Post by storm »

geraldm wrote:
Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:06 pm
https://youtu.be/Rer5J2HPSIw engine refresh went great
"This video is unavailable" says Youtube.
Fuel flow requirements calculations
Engine air flow requirement calculation: CFM = Cubic Inches x RPM x Volumetric Efficiency (VE) ÷ 3456

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