Spark Plugs

Tech about stuff that doesn't fit in the above categories
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Frank
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Spark Plugs

Post by Frank » Mon Jan 31, 2005 1:39 pm

I came across this web page that does a great job of explaining spark plugs: http://www.strappe.com/plugs.html The main site is geared towards motorcyles, so if you're interested in bikes too, it looks like an interesting place to visit.

The article discusses ignition advance and fuel mixture along with spark plugs. Advance is not just some mysterious number that you use to get more performance from your engine. Getting the proper advance under all conditions is one of the keys to getting optimum power and minimum fuel consumption from your engine. The goal is to get the peak pressure developed during combustion to occur at an optimum point past top dead center. Too early and the engine will be fighting itself. Too late and the combustion energy will be wasted. That's the reason the bikes mentioned in the article became more powerful with retarded timing and leaner fuel mixtures.

Frank


555Ron

Post by 555Ron » Tue May 03, 2005 9:06 pm

http://www.greenfire.com.au/

Hi, here is a site you might be interested in.

Frank
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Post by Frank » Sun May 29, 2005 9:15 pm

This spark plug reminds me a lot of the Bosch Platinum+4 spark plug. From what I can tell from the Greenfire web site, this device ignites the fuel within itself and directs the flames back out into the combustion chamber. I am not sure how well the fuel mixture will flow through this spark plug but Greenfire claims to have excellent test results. It also looks like this device is still in the start-up marketing phase and the manufacturer is trying to get an OEM contract. Has anyone used this spark plug?

I have been following the slant six forums and I found an interesting topic about spark plug recommendations. One of the posters recommends using extended tip spark plugs for slant sixes. Another topic shows a comparison between the standard and extended tip plugs. Intuitively, moving the spark closer to the centre of the combustion chamber should be more effective than having 4 electrodes, but this is just my opinion.

86Chevy
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Post by 86Chevy » Wed Nov 02, 2005 11:44 pm

555Ron wrote:http://www.greenfire.com.au/

Hi, here is a site you might be interested in.
These look like a gasoline version of the old pre-cup chambers used in diesel engines. Diesels had to go away from them because the took too much fuel to get the amount of power that would be expected from the size of the engine. More fuel means more emissions. It will be interesting to see how these will work.

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Post by Eskimo » Thu Nov 03, 2005 10:29 am

It baffles me why anyone would want to give the spark an "easy way out" with these 4 prong spark plugs, since electricity will always follow the path of least resistance, producing the weakest spark.

It should also be noted that Platinum +4 plugs were specifically named by Audi/VW as NOT to be used in their turbo engines - the electrodes were breaking off.
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86Chevy
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Post by 86Chevy » Thu Nov 03, 2005 2:45 pm

Good point but electricity will always find a place to ground as well. So every bit of electrical energy that goes to the plug will be used to make a spark, be it small ones on three and one big one or whatever I can see that it might help to have some spark exposed on four sides rather than the typical plug. But I'm no rocket scientist either

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